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by Fred McMillin
for September 2005

Wine

 

Ladies' Choice...
Wines Women Like More Than Men Do

Prologue

"Wine was first discovered by a woman."
     —William Younger
      Oxford scholar
      Gods, Men, and Wine

"Women buy 77% and consume 60% of the wine in America."
New York Times

Oh ho! Since the beginning and now in the 21st century, women have played a more important role in some wine activities than men. So what wines do women like more than men? They would be fine choices for ladies' meetings, etc.

 

The Answer

We reviewed women's and men's ratings of 160 wines ranging from $6 to $85. Twenty were over $40, 31 were imports. Here are the ten biggest female favorites. All are current releases.

WHITES
• Geyser Peak Viognier, $19
• Glazebrook New Zealand Sauvignon Blanc imported by Wildman, $14
• Jordan Chardonnay, $26

REDS
• Sobon Sangiovese, $15
• Guenoc Petite Sirah, $20
• Hahn Merlot, $14
• Napa Wine Company Cabernet Sauvignon, $32

DESSERTS
• Sobon Orange Muscat, $17
• Quady Starboard Port, $18

SPARKLERS
• Lanson Rose Label Champagne, France, $50

 

Comments

1. Women must be price conscious. Only one of the 19 most expensive wines made the list.

2. Women weren't too impressed by imports. Only two of the 31 are on the list.

3. For a Women's lunch, serve one of the three whites with a well-seasoned fish or fowl course, because all of those whites have above-average backbone. Then on to Sangiovese with veal, and the other reds with beef. Wind up with a lemon tart and one of the dessert wines or the champagne.

 

And a parting chuckle...

The winemaker for a major Sonoma winery wrote me saying, "I am not an expert at food and wine paring"...OR SPELLING!

 

Credits: Results were tabulated and coded by Ophie Mercado.

 
 
About the Writer

Fred McMillin, a veteran wine writer, has taught wine history for 30 years on three continents. For information about the wine courses he teaches every month at either San Francisco State University or San Francisco City College (Fort Mason Division), please fax him at (415) 567-4468.

 


 

 
 

This page created September 2005

Copyright © 2005
electronic Gourmet Guide, Inc.

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