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Passover on the Net

http://www.holidays.net/passover/index.htm  

Review by Debbie Mazo

 

Passover is an eight-day holiday commemorating the freedom of Jewish slaves from Egypt during the reign of the Pharaoh, Ramses II. The highlight of this springtime holiday is an elaborate meal called a Seder, where the story of Passover is told through the reading of the Haggadah, the Book of Exodus. Discover why the nights of this celebration are different than any other night, when you visit Passover on the Net.

Passover on the NetFalling on the first two nights of Passover, the Seder is the most important event in this tradition-filled celebration. The centerpiece of the meal is the Seder plate, which contains five different foods that remind Jews of the struggle for freedom from Egypt. The Seder plate includes Haroseth, a mixture of chopped walnuts, wine, cinnamon, and apples representing the mortar used to assemble the Pharaoh's bricks; parsley dipped in salt water commemorating the tears of the Jewish slaves; and roasted egg signifying springtime. Shank bone on the Seder plate symbolizes the sacrificial lamb offering, while freshly grated horseradish reflects the bitter affliction of slavery.

During Passover, observers are restricted from eating leavened (containing yeast) foods or grains. In their place, Matzoh (unleavened bread) and foods containing matzoh are eaten. To get a taste of Passover food customs, try the Matzoh Brie, one Matzoh sheet fried like French toast and then served plain or with sugar or jelly. If you're hosting your family Seder this year, serve a traditional entrée of Brisket in Marinade coated with a mixture of lemon juice, pepper, parsley, and marjoram. You're also just a click away from the site's list of Passover cookbooks, with even more holiday selections.

Passover on the Net presents other holiday festivities to the online world, including audio readings that describe how to prepare a traditional Seder as well as narrate a child's story of Passover. You can also download the words to popular Passover songs (PC and Mac versions) that will make the holiday traditions come alive for your family and friends this Passover season.

 

 
About the Writer

Debbie Mazo is a writer and editor based in Vancouver, Canada. She's been writing the NetFood Digest column for FoodWine since 1997. You can contact her at djmbc@[email-address-removed].

Copyright © 2001, Debbie Mazo. All rights reserved.

 
 



 

This page created April 2001

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